Posts for: December, 2015

By James B. Howell, D.M.D.
December 29, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
TestOutYourFutureLookWithaTrialSmile

Achieving a more attractive smile is often a big investment. And, like other big investments, it’s always advantageous to have the opportunity to “try it out” beforehand — especially something as visible and public as your smile.

We’ve come a long way in giving people ways to preview their smiles before the permanent restoration is in place. Computer imaging is one of the more effective ways of doing this. But what if you could actually see for yourself in a mirror rather than on a computer monitor or printed page what your new smile will look like? Now you can with a “trial smile.”

To create a trial smile, we temporarily apply composite resin, a tooth-colored dental material, directly to your teeth. We can shape and sculpt the resin to mimic the effects of veneers, crowns or other dental work proposed to create your new smile. Not only will you be able to see your smile as it will appear, you’ll also be able to get a sense of the texture and depth of the new dental work, something you can’t quite capture with two-dimensional computer imaging. And while you won’t be able to wear the trial smile home, we can certainly take photos for you to show friends and family for their opinion.

Trial smiles are also beneficial in helping us plan your smile makeover. By viewing how you interact with your new look — facial expressions, speech and, of course, smiling — we can fine tune the amount of tooth preparation necessary, as well as the color, shape and texture of the permanent restorations.

Incorporating a trial smile into your treatment will involve an additional expense, but only as a relatively small part of your overall treatment cost. But the benefit it can bring in helping us achieve a smile that’s both attractive and satisfying to you is well worth the cost. “Trying out” your smile ahead of time can give you added peace of mind that your new look is just what you expected.

If you would like more information on trial smiles and other restoration previews, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Testing Your Smile Makeover.”


By James B. Howell, D.M.D.
December 14, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
TomHanksAbscessedToothGetsCastAway

Did you see the move Cast Away starring Tom Hanks? If so, you probably remember the scene where Hanks, stranded on a remote island, knocks out his own abscessed tooth — with an ice skate, no less — to stop the pain. Recently, Dear Doctor TV interviewed Gary Archer, the dental technician who created that special effect and many others.

“They wanted to have an abscess above the tooth with all sorts of gunk and pus and stuff coming out of it,” Archer explained. “I met with Tom and I took impressions [of his mouth] and we came up with this wonderful little piece. It just slipped over his own natural teeth.” The actor could flick it out with his lower tooth when the time was right during the scene. It ended up looking so real that, as Archer said, “it was not for the easily squeamish!”

That’s for sure. But neither is a real abscess, which is an infection that becomes sealed off beneath the gum line. An abscess may result from a trapped piece of food, uncontrolled periodontal (gum) disease, or even an infection deep inside a tooth that has spread to adjacent periodontal tissues. In any case, the condition can cause intense pain due to the pressure that builds up in the pus-filled sac. Prompt treatment is required to relieve the pain, keep the infection from spreading to other areas of the face (or even elsewhere in the body), and prevent tooth loss.

Treatment involves draining the abscess, which usually stops the pain immediately, and then controlling the infection and removing its cause. This may require antibiotics and any of several in-office dental procedures, including gum surgery, a root canal, or a tooth extraction. But if you do have a tooth that can’t be saved, we promise we won’t remove it with an ice skate!

The best way to prevent an abscess from forming in the first place is to practice conscientious oral hygiene. By brushing your teeth twice each day for two minutes, and flossing at least once a day, you will go a long way towards keeping harmful oral bacteria from thriving in your mouth.

If you have any questions about gum disease or abscesses, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Periodontal (Gum) Abscesses” and “Confusing Tooth Pain.”


By James B. Howell, D.M.D.
December 06, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
WithProperManagementDentalImplantscanbeaRealityforDiabetics

Many people with diabetes are hesitant about getting dental implants because they’re under the impression their chances of failure are greater than for non-diabetics. But if you’re one of the 26 million Americans with diabetes, that isn’t necessarily so — with a little extra precaution before, during and after implant surgery.

Diabetes is a group of diseases that affect how the body processes glucose. This simple sugar is used by the body to provide energy to cells, but can also cause damage if its volume level in the bloodstream is too high. The body normally regulates this through the hormone insulin produced by the pancreas.

The pancreas in people with Type 1 diabetes doesn’t produce insulin and so they must receive an outside source of the hormone through daily injections with careful daily monitoring of glucose levels. Those with Type 2 diabetes, the most common form of the disease, don’t produce a sufficient amount of insulin or the body no longer responds to the insulin produced. For either type, abnormal glucose levels — either too high or too low — can have adverse affects on the body, including blindness, nerve damage, gangrene, coma or death.

Diabetes can also slow wound healing, increase the risk of infection, and alter the body’s inflammatory response, all of which are major concerns when placing implants. Because implant placement involves minor surgery in which a wound results, there’s been wide concern that a slower healing process could increase the risk of implant failure.

Recent studies, though, are encouraging especially for patients who have their diabetes under control through medication, diet and exercise. Patients with poor glucose control are at higher risk, because it can take longer for the bone to heal around an implant after placement. For such individuals special considerations to guard against infection may be needed during implant surgery.

In fact, the implant success rate for most diabetics is about the same as for non-diabetic patients, 95%. With proper disease management and a little extra wound care, you can be among the many that experience a favorable outcome and a more attractive smile with dental implants.

If you would like more information on diabetes and dental care, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.




Louisville, KY Cosmetic Dentistry
James B. Howell, D.M.D.
3936 Dutchmans Lane
Louisville, KY 40207
(502) 899-7766

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